History

History

The Colorado Wheat Research Foundation (CWRF) was formed by the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee in 1988, to further educational and scientific programs related to wheat. A new era in the development and distribution of wheat seed began in August, 1995 with the signing of an historic agreement involving proprietary protection for new wheat varieties (cultivars) developed at Colorado State University (CSU). The Colorado Wheat Cultivar Program consists of a process that begins at CSU with the development of new wheat varieties. CWRF moves the process forward by acquiring ownership of the varieties and applying for protection. From there, CWRF coordinates distribution of foundation and registered seed to eligible certified seed growers while the Colorado Seed Growers Association (CSGA) provides seed certification and marketing services to its participating members. Royalties from the sale of certified seed included in the Wheat Cultivar Program are collected by CWRF and net royalties are returned to CSU. The process comes full circle as CSU utilizes those funds for the advancement of wheat-related research. Successful research that has been, and will continue to be, beneficial to wheat producers.

Royalties For Research

CWRF collects fees and royalties (generally 30-60 cents per bushel on certified seed) from the sale by certified seed growers of wheat varieties included in the Colorado Wheat Cultivar Program. After deducting its actual expenses, CWRF returns the remaining funds to CSU. The majority of those funds support wheat-related research programs at CSU and provide royalties to those researchers who developed the new protected varieties. The Colorado Wheat Cultivar Program has added a total of $550,000 to support the wheat breeding program and wheat related research, in addition to funding provided by the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee (CWAC) to CSU.

Management

The CWRF board of directors is comprised of the executive committees of CWAC and the Colorado Association of Wheat Growers (CAWG). A president, vice president and secretary-treasurer are elected annually with terms of office that run concurrently with the fiscal year of July 1-June 30.

Wheat Varieties

Over the past few years, Colorado growers have made substantial yield gains with new Colorado State University (CSU) varieties like Hatcher, Ripper and Bill Brown, varieties developed in Colorado that are specifically bred for Colorado wheat growers. The benefit of locally bred wheat varieties was obvious in 2010, when Colorado set a new yield record of 45 bushels per acre. By focusing solely on the needs of Colorado growers, the CSU wheat breeding program has developed varieties specifically tailored to the extremes of the Colorado growing conditions. Our altitude, dry conditions, and high temperatures often cause more extreme stresses than more eastern areas of the Great Plains. Varieties bred for narrow adaptation to more eastern areas of the Great Plains simply aren’t as well adapted to Colorado’s conditions as CSU-developed varieties, giving CSU-developed varieties a yield advantage. The complete portfolio of CSU-developed varieties arms growers with complementary wheat varieties that perform best in Colorado year in and year out. Extensive plot testing across the state indicates these are the top-yielding varieties for a variety of Colorado conditions, including dryland and irrigated production, drought stress, disease and insect infestations, and more. Colorado wheat growers can use the diversity of CSU-developed wheat varieties to manage the risk associated with Colorado’s unpredictable growing conditions. Growers who reap the benefit of these improved certified seed varieties also help support the CSU Wheat Breeding and Genetics program through a small royalty. Since 1995, CWRF has provided nearly $1.4 million in royalties to support continued wheat research and breeding at CSU. Together with support from check-off funds, these dollars help to preserve a strong public wheat breeding program at CSU. Investing in certified seed is an investment in improved varieties for the future.

Snowmass (2009) Hard White Winter Wheat

  • Top dryland yields, comparable to the popular varieties Ripper and Hatcher
  • Excellent overall disease resistance package - stripe and stem rust, wheat streak mosaic virus
  • Sprout tolerance better than Platte, similar to Trego, less than Danby
  • Part of CWRF/Conagra Ultragrain Premium Program

Thunder CL (2008) Hard White Winter Wheat, Clearfield

  • Top yielder under irrigation, high dryland yields under stress
  • Good test weight, excellent milling and baking quality
  • Good resistance to stem rust, stripe rust, wheat streak mosaic virus
  • Part of CWRF/Conagra Ultragrain Premium Program

Bill Brown (2007)

  • High dryland and irrigated yields
  • High test weight, good milling and baking quality
  • Resistant to leaf rust, moderate resistance to stripe rust

Ripper (2006)

  • High dryland yield and yield stability
  • Excellent drought and high temperature stress tolerance
  • Excellent milling and baking quality
  • Resistant to new race of stem rust, Ug-99

Hatcher (2004)

  • High dryland yield and yield stability
  • Moderate resistance to stripe rust
  • Excellent milling and baking quality
  • Shattering tolerant, medium-long coleoptile

Bond CL - Clearfield wheat for grassy weeds (2004)

  • Top yielder under irrigation, high dryland yields
  • Taller plant type relative to Above
  • Shattering tolerant
  • Clearfield wheat, no saving of seed

Ankor (2002) - RWA resistant* Akron type

  • High dryland yields, early row closure, shattering tolerant
  • Better baking quality, straw strength, and yield than Akron

Above (2001) - Clearfield wheat for grassy weeds

  • High yields, excellent stress tolerance
  • Shattering tolerant
  • Marginal baking quality
  • No seed saving allowed

Avalanche (2001) - Hard white winter wheat

  • High test weights
  • Excellent fall growth and spring regrowth
  • Shattering tolerant

Prairie Red (1998) - TAM 107 type

  • Excellent stress tolerance
  • Shattering tolerant
  • Marginal baking quality

Prowers 99 (1997) - Lamar type

  • Tall wheat for increased residue
  • High test weights and excellent quality
  • Long coleoptile, excellent emergence

Yumar (1997) - Yuma type

  • High dryland yields at higher production levels
  • Excellent straw strength
  • Excellent baking quality

Halt (1994)

  • Yields comparable to TAM 107, greater at higher production levels
  • Excellent baking quality